IEEE - CAS Bangalore Chapter, India     CAS Chapter - Region 10
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - Circuits and Systems Society
Goals: To conduct seminars, workshops, and other events pertaining to all aspects of electronic circuits and systems

Event Reports - 2014
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May
Seminar on Leveraging Periodicity in Human Mobility for Next Place Prediction
May 29, 2014
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on Leveraging Periodicity in Human Mobility for Next Place PredictionA seminar entitled "Leveraging Periodicity in Human Mobility for Next Place Prediction" was arranged on May 29, 2014 at Texas Instruments India, Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter, PragaTI (Texas Instruments India Technical University) and IEEE Bangalore Section.

Bhaskar Prabhala from Penn State University delivered the talk that focused on the research involving periodic transitions from place to place that are inherent in human movements, and detecting these periodic movements in traces of user tracking data. The speaker put forth the concept of algorithms leveraging techniques and models to detect periodicity in individual user movements, where the algorithms predict a user's next place given only the current context of time-stamp and location. These algorithms are then applied to real user mobility data sets, and the prediction accuracy depends on the ratio of periodic movements to noise in user traces. These results and the analysis were presented at the IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference 2014, and the current research aims to generate end to end trajectories for users in the trace data sets using periodicity and place semantics. By overlaying these trajectories intersection points that result in models for opportunistic mobile networks are determined.

Around 10 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

April
Seminar on On-Chip Electrostatic Discharge Protection: Essentials and Research Opportunities
April 16,2014 (3 to 4 PM)
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on On-Chip Electrostatic Discharge Protection: Essentials and Research OpportunitiesA seminar entitled "On-Chip Electrostatic Discharge Protection: Essentials and Research Opportunities" was arranged on April 16, 2014 at Texas Instruments India, Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter and PragaTI (Texas Instruments India Technical University).

Prof. Mayank Shrivastava of IISc, Bangalore delivered the talk that focused on on-chip ESD from the research perspective. The speaker pointeded out on ESD being a serious reliability threat to semiconductor chips, highlighting the fact that chip technology, process, device and circuit co-design requirements for ESD protection are often not known to researchers exploring device, materials, process and design options for future nano-electronic products.
The talk provided an introduction to the essential concepts of on-chip ESD protection devices and circuits, highlighting research options for researchers in the area of materials, nano-electronic devices, circuits and compact modelling. It concluded with an outlook on the ESD device research in the advanced CMOS technologies.

Around 25 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

March
Seminar on Research in Analog/RF systems at IISc, Bangalore
March 26,2014 (2 to 4 PM)
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on Research in Analog/RF systems at IISc, BangaloreA seminar entitled "Research in Analog/RF systems at IISc, Bangalore" was arranged on March 26, 2014 at Texas Instruments India, Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter and PragaTI (Texas Instruments India Technical University).

Prof. Gaurab Banerjee of IISc, Bangalore delivered the talk that provided a brief overview of the current and planned research in Analog/RF systems in the ECE Department at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. The talk also comprised presentations by Prof.Banerjees's students covering other aspects of research on Analog/RF systems.

Vishal Khatri talked on "Cognitive radio based dynamic spectrum access (DSA) techniques", that allows for efficient utilization of spectrum, with spectrum sensing being a key enabler for Dynamic Spectrum Access. Since the traditional implementation methods for spectrum sensing have focused on a serial scan of a narrow band or a wide band RF spectrum where the computational onus lies on the digital baseband, his work proposed a parallel multi band RF spectrum sensing to alleviate the digital baseband computational overhead. One of the key challenges is the design of a frequency synthesizer which can generate a comb of uniformly LO frequencies with acceptable phase noise.

Immanuel Raja covered "Highly Linear, Re-Configurable Transmitter", where he pointed traditional integrated transmitters being inherently narrowband. His work aimed at targeting the design of a highly linear, re-configurable transmitter which can operate over a wide range of carrier frequencies with variable bandwidths. His work explored the use of digital-intensive architectures to meet the requirements. Cognitive radios, Software Defined Radios, millimeter-wave radios were pointed out being potential applications of the work.

Zaira Zahir talked about "Frequency Synthesis for wideband applications" highlighting the fact that there is a scarcity of spectrum as the number of users is increasing every day which has resulted in active research in areas like software defined radios(SDR), cognitive radios(CR) and mm wave radios, requiring the use of wideband and reconfigurable receivers. Designing of such wideband and reconfigurable receivers is a challenging task and one of the main challenges lies in the synthesis of a wide range of frequencies for these receivers. A frequency synthesizer is required to down-convert a received RF signal to base band or to some intermediate band and correspondingly to up convert it in a transmitter. Apart from covering wide range of frequencies synthesizer needs to have very low Phase Noise and fast settling time.

Javed GS's work focused on "ADC based Sub-systems for Sensor Interfaces" where sensor interfaces are dominated with the presence of high accuracy, high resolution ADCs in the backend. He pointed out that in most occasions, the complete dynamic range is not utilized in its operation. Designing a subsystem which works with a sensor interface closely and works with a lower resolution ADC and in a smaller area is seen as a challenge, and his work tries to meet thsee requirements. Cognitive Radio, Software Defined Radios and Capacitance Sensors are potential applications.

Around 35 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

January
Seminar on Signal and Image Processing Research Activity at Spectrum Lab
January 24,2014 (3 to 4 PM)
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on Signal and Image Processing Research Activity at Spectrum LabA seminar entitled "Signal and Image Processing Research Activity at Spectrum Lab" was arranged on January 24, 2014 at Texas Instruments India, Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter and PragaTI (Texas Instruments India Technical University).

Dr. Chandra Sekhar Seelamantula of IISc, Bangalore delivered the talk, that took an overview of the various signal and image processing research activities going on in the IISc lab. Some key and latest results from the IISc lab were also presented that related to: Speech and audio compression, Speech and vocals time and pitch scaling, Image de-noising, Biomedical image processing and Image reconstruction in optical imaging.

The talk focused on those results and their impact, and seeked to identify points of potential collaboration.

Dr.Chandra Sekhar Seelamantula obtained a Bachelor of Engineering degree in 1999 from Osmania University, and his Ph.D. degree in 2005 from the Indian Institute of Science with a thesis titled, "Time varying Signal Models: Envelope and Frequency Estimation with Applications to Speech and Music Signal Compression."

He also specialized during his Ph.D. in the development of auditory-motivated signal processing models for speech and audio applications. Since the year 2005, he has worked as a Technology Consultant for M/s. ESQUBE Communication Solutions Private Limited, Bangalore, developng proprietary audio coding solutions, Biomedical Imaging Group, and was with Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, as postdoctoral fellow specializing in the field of Image Processing, Optical-Coherence Tomography, Holography, Splines, and Sampling Theories. Since July 2009, he is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

Around 25 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

Seminar on Phase-based computing using self-sustaining nonlinear oscillators
January 9,2014 (3 to 4 PM)
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on Phase-based computing using self-sustaining nonlinear oscillatorsProf. Jaijeet Roychowdhury of EECS, University of California, Berkeley delivered a seminar on "Phase-based computing using self-sustaining nonlinear oscillators" at Texas Instruments India on January 9, 2014 in Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter and PragaTI (Texas Instruments India Technical University).

His introduction to the subject began with the 1950s, when Eiichi Goto and John von Neumann proposed an innovative scheme for digital computation that used the phase of undulating waveforms to encode logic. He noted that however, circuitry for phase logic has so far been difficult to miniaturize, or to run at room temperature.

He talk tried demonstrating how virtually any self-sustaining nonlinear oscillator can be used to implement phase logic -- thus opening the door to the use of many kinds of nano-scale oscillators in diverse domains, such as micro-electronics, nano-devices and biology. Further, he showed that phase logic has inherent noise and robustness advantages over conventional level-based logic. The speaker argued that these advances make phase logic a strong contender for robust, low-power next generation computation.

Prof.Jaijeet Roychowdhury received a Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, in 1987, and a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley in 1993.
His professional interests include the analysis, simulation and design of electronic, biological and mixed-domain systems. He was cited for Extraordinary Achievement by Bell Laboratories in 1996. Over the years, he has authored or co-authored seven best or distinguished papers at ASP-DAC, DAC, and ICCAD.

Around 30 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

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Seminar on Abstractions and Formalisms for Analog CAD
January 9,2014 (4 to 5 PM)
Texas Instruments India, Bangalore Campus
Report by C.P.Ravikumar

Seminar on Abstractions and Formalisms for Analog CADA seminar on "Abstractions and Formalisms for Analog CAD" was delivered by Dr. Pallab Dasgupta of IIT Kharagpur at Texas Instruments India on January 9, 2014 in Bangalore. The event was jointly organized by IEEE CAS Bangalore Chapter and PragaTI (Texas Instruments India India Technical University).

His introduction pointed to the fact that traditionally analog circuit design has been a niche area driven by the domain knowledge and experience of specialist designers. Digital circuits, which are based on Boolean logic and finite state machines, are predominantly synthesized using CAD tools. He mentioned that the attempts to automate analog design flows have been largely unsuccessful in the past, mainly due to the large disconnect between high level formalisms like hybrid automata and low level transistor netlists, and the computational complexity in formally relating the two levels of abstraction.

On the other hand, he noted that the increasing trend of using analog circuit components in large digital integrated circuits, is pushing the frontiers of analog CAD, particularly considering the verification challenges. He opined that it is becoming imperative to be able to capture the analog design intent at a high level of abstraction which is compatible with the formalisms used in digital design. His talk focused on this trend and outline some of the research that has been taking place at IIT Kharagpur in this area.

Dr. Pallab Dasgupta is a Professor at the Dept. of Computer Sc. & Engg, IIT Kharagpur, and also the current Associate Dean (Sponsored Research) at IIT Kharagpur. His research interests include Formal Verification, Artificial Intelligence and VLSI with over 150 research papers and 3 books in these areas. He leads the Verification group at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur which has research collaborations with several industries. Dr. Dasgupta received the IBM Faculty award, the IESA Technomentor award and the young scientist medals of INSA and INAE.

Around 15 participatants including IEEE members attended the seminar.

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